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Ireland in Schools

Making learning fun & challenging
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New url, 28/03/2012
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Welcome!

‘Irish literature has created a magical learning environment

for our children.
Its range and quality enable all of them to participate in our

Ireland project and to produce work of fantastic quality.'
Gorsemoor Primary School, Staffordshire
 

 
  
 
'It was very, very fun.

Irish week made me feel proud to be part Irish.
It is a very cultural place and I hope someday

I could go to Ireland.'
Year 4 pupil, Liverpool Pilot Scheme
Before the Irish week, hehad not realised he was of Irish descent. 

  

'I used to think Irish troubles had nothing to do with me.

Now I realise there are very strong links.'
Year 11 student, Nottingham Pilot Scheme

 

 

 

 

 

 

'I really like the idea of taking the Easter Rising and the

Western Frontas a case study to illuminate bigger

issues of identity and representation.
This is a splendid example of how historical content

can be tremendously significant whilst also being

a vehicle for some transferable skills and values.'
School of Education, Warwick University