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Ireland in Schools

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Learning from teachers in Ireland
 
Ireland in Schools is frequently asked about the availability of some of the imaginative and
challenging teaching materials used in schools in the Republic of Ireland.

Among the best known free resources are the teaching guides provided by
1. the O’Brien Press, Ireland’s leading publisher of books for children and young adults,
2. the more varied materials dowloadable from that ‘portal for Irish education’, scoilnet and
3. skool.ie, which focuses on the Irish Junior and Senior Cycle curricula and brings teachers and students 'highly innovative, interactive and exciting learning'.
Less well known, perhaps, are

4. the exemplars contained in the teachers’ guidelines published by Ireland’s National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA);

5. the work of the History In-Service Team supporting Leaving Certificate History; and

6. the projects developed for TeachNet Ireland, which funds ‘innovative Irish teachers throughout Ireland to publish curriculum units that demonstrate the integration of ICT into classroom teaching in a meaningful and practical way’.
 
7. the student materials produced by Oscail, Ireland's National Distance Education Centre.

It is worth bearing in mind that primary in Ireland goes up to the age of 12, Year 7 in England and Wales.