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Four Kinds, etc., Year 8 text unit, lesson 10
Click here for the complete unit

Objectives

 

 

Introduction 

Lesson starters have been suspended for the week to allow

pupils to work on an extended paired and small group activity.

Plenary

 

 

Sentence

construction

and

punctuation

2

variety

of

sentence

structure

• Listen to Siobhán Parkinson’s tape of Chapter 11, "Gerard’s Tale" - contact IiS.

 

1. What parallels are there between the Tale and Gerard’s own experiences?

2. What makes this a good story?

e.g. limited number of characters;

a main event that triggers the rest of the story

mainly narrative with little dialogue (a la Roald Dahl)

it is short.

• Taking responses from pupils,

the teacher models some initial pupil-generated ideas on aspects of Beverley's character, on to the board or to paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaking

2

Develop

recount

 • Group Task: In groups prepare to tell ‘Beverley’s Tale’.

• Recap on the previous three lessons when pupils have been writing about Beverley’s character and direct pupils to consider how aspects of Beverley’s background and character will be reflected in the oral tale to be prepared. Using the board or flipchart, agree some of her key characteristics.

• Refer also to lesson 7 when pupils considered that telling stories in many cultures often helps the story teller to reflect on and understand their own experiences.

• Explain to pupils that initially this is a paired oral activity. Remind pupils of any agreed routines and expectations that exist within the class in relation to speaking and listening activities.

• Using Shared Writing strategies, model to the class possible ways of organising their time in pairs to ensure that by the end of lesson 10, Beverley’s story is complete.

• Give out the first sentence of "Beverley’s Tale" from P.133: "Once there was a beautiful young girl with long legs and wonderful long golden hair, ‘ Beverley began....".

• In pairs, use the planning sheet to draft initial ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Homework

• Think about how Beverley, as we know her from the novel, will fit into your tale. 


Worksheet for Lesson 10

With your partner, you will be preparing to tell Beverley’s Tale.

 
Use the following key questions to help you to think about Beverley.

1. What do you already know about Beverley?

2. Identify 3 key characteristics of Beverley’s character that you are going to incorporate into your tale.

3. You can adapt the following structure but the following prompts may be helpful

 

Who are the main characters in the tale?


Where does your tale take place?


What is the main incident in this tale?


What does Beverley learn about herself during this event?


What is the moral of this tale?


How does the tale end?